FAIRVIEW PARK CITY SCHOOLS

Summit Learning Chats Resources and Meeting Archive

On March 4, 2018, the District invited parents and community members to take part in a conversation and sharing of thoughts regarding the District’s implementation of the Summit Learning Platform (formerly known as “Basecamp”). 

Notes and the audio recording from each Summit Learning Chat session will be posted on this page. 

Session Dates and Sign Up

Resources

» Download the Informational Packet provided for attendees.

» View the Grading in the PLP Video
» View the Summit Learning at FPCS Video

Agenda for Meetings

  1. Welcome
  2. Why we are here
  3. To provide another series of opportunities to listen to parent and student concerns and answer questions
  4. To seek more thoughts and ideas on how to improve our collective efforts and practice
  5. To provide direct and extended access to Board of Education members
  6. Norms for the session
  7. Civil discourse
  8. Seek to understand
  9. Appreciative inquiry
  10. Full and equal participation for all attendees
  11.  Critical analysis
  12. The session will be recorded and posted as a podcast to increase access to the community
  13. Review of handouts provided
  14. Let the chat begin!

Summit Learning Chat: March 5, 2018, 7:00-9:15pm

Those in attendance:

Parents and Students

Heidi Miller and Olivia

Jennifer Bolander

Amy Whalen and Molly

Julie Rehor

Kathie and Scott Courtney

Lisa Hull

Maryann VanSchoor

Iken Sans and Drake (7:44pm)

Board Members
Joe Shucofsky
Kellie DuBay Gillis

Administrators
Chris Vicha
Bill Wagner
Melanie Wightman
Amanda Lloyd

Teachers
Joe Dianetti

Listen to the Conversation

Misperceptions/misinformation:

  • The system is not still called Basecamp! It was re-branded as Summit Learning early into the 2016-2017 school year.
  • There are too many restrictions on teachers, taking away their craft.
  • Teachers aren’t helping/teaching kids – or at least, kids are FEELING like teachers don’t care.
  • Focus Areas/Assessments are most important (when actually Projects = 70%, Focus Areas = 30%)
  • Kids aren’t learning  (There wasn’t a review of the MAP data that shows different, but this is the feeling)
  • Students are on the computer all class period (The students present stated teachers usually teach the first half of class or so, then students work on focus areas or projects.)
  • Students aren’t allowed to print anything  (yes, they can!)

Constructive critiques:

  • Students and parents want more teacher interaction
  • More time is needed for students to complete assessments
  • Don’t lose the focus on the “joy of learning”
  • Kids are cheating on assessments – Improve supervision of kids taking assessments
  • Let other teachers open assessments when a teacher is out, etc.
  • Kids are prone to distractibility and the tech use increases the likelihood of being off task
  • Multiple communication tools and resources are frustrating to students and parents. Limit using to only one or two resources.  Stop using Edmodo when using the PLP.  Can we design ONE AREA of the website to link to all? Links are available in the Parent Resource Center located on the district homepage.
  • No one is using the This Week page for the students.  It would help students organize and plan.  (Use in addition to the weekly email communications to the parents.)
  • Some teachers are implementing better than others  The students and parents said Mr. Dianetti is awesome and could be a trainer.
  • The MS teachers and the HS teachers are not implementing on the same level. Align the MS better to what the HS is doing.

Areas for (short-term) change:

  • Provide parents a “day in the life of a student” video  There is one that is specific to a Summit School in CA, but we can make our own. The FHS Digital Media students produced this overview video last year. 
  • Teach kids to take better quality notes and have teachers inspect the notes for quality before allowing to test
  • Allow students to make note sheets, but do not let them use notes. (teach the skill, but don’t let them use it as a crutch)  Or, mix it up:  sometimes, yes – sometimes, no
  • Get rid of IXL and other resources in the playlists that have question limits OR advertisements OR payment required after 10 questions
  • Create more parent training in how to read grades in PLP (or in general) – share videos (A video was produced by the 9th grade team last year)
  • Make sure EVERY parent gets the weekly email – USE THE TEMPLATE
  • Work to get more 1:1 time with mentors
  • Work with teachers to increase technology monitoring and keeping students on task
  • Keep a close eye on the screen time!
  • Survey the students for their feedback and recommendations – Hold some student focus groups with teachers/administrators
  • Improve communications between teachers and mentors so mentors have accurate student progress data

Areas needing further investigation/research/discussion:

  • Get quarterly (weekly, if possible) grades to roll into PowerSchool (Parents mentioned getting emails on Mondays with no information.)  Keep working on it.
  • Multiple communication tools and resources are frustrating to students and parents… PICK ONE  (Limit using to only one or two resources.)  Stop using Edmodo when using the PLP . The Parent Resource Center has links. 
  • Can the blue line be quarterly instead of daily?  (Expand opportunities to help students learn organizational and time management skills.)
  • Allow students to make note sheets, but do not let them use notes. (teach the skill, but don’t let them use it as a crutch)  Or, mix it up:  sometimes, yes – sometimes, no
  • Make sure the parent logins work. (However, it was noted that using the student login provides parents with full access to the student’s Google Docs assignments – this is better!)

Positives:

  1. Keep the weekly emails to parents
  2. It’s very nice to be able to see everything:  full curriculum and student performance

Fairview is one of the best around with technology –  find the balance and sweet spot.

Summit Learning Chat: March 7, 2018, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Parents and Students

Krista Ries and Cadance
Patricia Rigalski
Maria, Jeffrey, Josi Rigalski
Rani Stevens and Ella
Tiffany Howery
Eric Black
John DiGennaro

Board 
J. Shucofsky

Admin
Chris Honeck
Bill Wagner
Melanie Wightman
Amanda Lloyd

Teachers
Andy Bruening

Listen to the Conversation

Misperceptions/misinformation:

  • The system is NOT still called Basecamp!  🙂
  • Parents can’t have parent-teacher conferences whenever they want
  • The meaning of “self-paced” – clarify what this means and what it looks like in Fairview

 

Constructive critiques:

  • Parents are concerned about behavior management in the classrooms – Concerns about students off-task with technology (Teachers are concerned about this as well)
  • Students’ anxiety levels are high
  • More MS support is needed for students’ needs.  Specifically, more interaction with teachers,  training on how to navigate the system, general study skills, greater range of literature
  • Parents want more access to MS teachers (especially at events like this)
  • Some students feel like teachers aren’t teaching- that they are teaching themselves.
  • Parents want to see and understand an increase in the rigor of the curriculum
  • Students skim over the topics instead of doing their best and the current practice encourages it  (also, students cheat!)  Have teachers hold students more accountable for quality products.
  • The teachers are not implementing consistently 6-10
  • Students need to learn how to take better notes
  • Students want more interaction and relationship-building between peers and teachers
  • More time is needed at the beginning of the school year teaching the students the platform, the Cognitive Skills Rubric and the expectations

 

Areas for (short-term) change:

  • Confirm that parents get to meet with teachers at any time and can visit classrooms
  • MS Parent Teacher Conference model (meet with mentor teacher) didn’t work
  • Develop better continuity and structure for OA6 – OA7 – OA8
  • Bring the expanded tutoring back… include before AND after school and advertise it better to the parents
  • Use email as the key communication tool for parents
  • Provide early trainings for parents on how to interpret student performance, the theory behind the change in teaching/learning/assessment, etc.
  • Increase student-teacher engagement, especially at the MS
  • Have teachers provide more support for students in the power focus areas
  • Pull MS and HS together in structure and practice.  Current communications from MS and HS is frequently conflicting
  • Spend more time teaching students how to take notes (as early as 3rd and 4th grade)
  • Teachers should respond to emails within 24 hours during the week
  • Review the PLP system when the projects are due (Deadlines on Friday make project turn red over the weekend if not graded. This sometimes triggers punishments for students over the weekends when the work has been submitted, but not yet graded.)

 

Areas needing further investigation/research/discussion:

  • “Can’t start next year’s curriculum because student isn’t done with projects yet”
  • How are we defining “self-paced” – clarify what this means and what it looks like in Fairview
  • Look into book choices for ELA–find ways to offer more differentiation, challenge

 

Positives:

  1. Parents like the theory and goal of emphasizing project-based learning
  2. The advanced technology of the district is a good thing
  3. There are examples of good implementation and student-teacher relationships
  4. Parents like the theory and concept of what the district is trying to do. Do a better job explaining it to students and parents) and the focus on learning how to learn.
  5. It is evident that there is now a focus on coordinating and improving the curriculum

 

Summit Learning Chat: March 13, 2018, 7-9 p.m.

Those in attendance:

Parents and Students:

Carolyn Rowen and Shannon

Darlene Howes

Karen LaRocque

Colleen Faile and Alexis

Bridgette Polyak and Julia

Michelle Monahan

Ellen Giermann

Katy Reagan

Dusty Runyan (?)

Administrators

A. Lloyd

R. Mohr

B. Wagner

M. Wightman

Teachers:

J. Hicks

J. Dianetti

C. Koczur

C. Vandrak

Board Members

J. Shucofsky

J. Dalton

 

Listen to the Conversation

Concerns:

  • FHS seniors aren’t prepared for college
  • Teachers are not helping students – teachers always redirect students back to the resources
  • Some staff who are monitoring assessments give students answers to questions
  • There are other teachers, other than those who are attending the Summit Learning Chats, who aren’t the “best of the best” and aren’t implementing as well as those who have attended
  • This is difficult for parents
  • The students’ data is being given to other organizations
  • There was no input from the parents about the selection of this implementation
  • Current 7th graders need extra attention moving forward since last year was difficult

Misperceptions/misinformation:

  • Students can do little work (e.g. just complete the focus areas) and will get an “A”
  • Students are “staring at a computer” all the time (The program is like ‘home school”)
  • The district is using all Summit material in total, without any modification
  • Teachers aren’t allowed to teach – they can’t/don’t make the platform/program their own
  • The teachers don’t support the use of the Summit Learning program
  • Students who are good students don’t look any different to colleges from students who procrastinate, then complete the work at the end of the school year
  • A lot of students are leaving the district because of this program
  • Students can move forward into the next school year’s content after just completing the Focus Areas (they have to complete the projects, too)

Constructive critiques:

  • Encourage and communicate some of the positives that are coming from the program
  • Middle school program is operating differently than the high school.  The HS implementation is working better
  • Concern that the current style of instruction does not work for all students (show the data)
  • Students shouldn’t be able to take tests multiple times (Maybe put a limit on it)
  • The full year “big picture” timeline is overwhelming or encourages students to procrastinate (“I have all year”)
  • Students are mocking the Fairview Advantage and Summit “Basecamp”
  • “Take the good and leave the bad and move forward”
  • Kids are cheating, students can Google answers and the actual assignments (3rd party)
  • Some students are saying they aren’t learning anything (The district needs to challenge traditionally-successful students more)
  • Implementation of the instructional and assessment changes were not (are not) done well
  • De-emphasize the “blue line”
  • Help students self-analyze their own level of knowledge and understanding
  • All teachers need to implement teaching and learning more consistently
  • Teach students self-control and self-regulation

Areas for (short-term) change:

  • Conduct a survey of college students and ask how they are doing and where they are struggling to inform modifications for improvements
  • Assure that students have to do some sort of remediation exercise prior to re-taking an assessment
  • Continue to teach good note-taking skills and…
  • Do a better job of explaining the rationale for the gradual weaning of students from using notes grades 6-10  (re-evaluate)
  • Emphasize that the projects are more important than the content assessments
  • Expand the projects – get out of the bubble of the school and into the community
  • Get students to interact more with each other
  • Educate the students on the use of the help desk to report problems
  • The amount of PLT (personalized learning time) should be more consistent
  • Teach students more about responsible use of technology (phones and tech)
  • Students shouldn’t have phones in the classrooms
  • Explain why the district moved to Summit and the cost associated with the use of the platform  (What would it cost to abandon Summit?)
  • Hold STUDENT Summit Learning Chats
  • Make sure when projects are SUBMITTED, they aren’t red
  • Consider an option for students to take various classes without Summit

Areas needing further investigation/research/discussion:

  • Kids are cheating, students can Google answers and the actual assignments (3rd party)
  • Can we measure how an average student is doing (MAP)

Positives:

  • Students are learning time-management
  • Students are being held accountable for their work
  • The parents support the teachers
  • Projects help students learn a lot – working with other students and teachers
  • There are many different ways the students can learn with the many different resources on the platform
  • The platform provides a base curriculum that is aligned to the Ohio Learning Standards
  • Many of the concerns and “defects” of the program can be fixed

 

Summit Learning Chat April 2, 2018, 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

Those in attendance:

Parents and Students

Joe Widman
Mike Schneider
Kristen Broadbent
Kevin Wering
Erin Samide
Danielle Jankowski

Board Members

Matthew Hrubey
Joslyn Dalton

Administrators
Bill Wagner
Melanie Wightman
Amanda Lloyd

Teachers
Andy Bruening
Matt Ziemnik
Adam Garcia

Listen to the Conversation 

Concerns:

  • Students aren’t always permitted to see the answers to the questions they missed.  (See Areas for short-term change bullet 3 below)

Misperceptions/misinformation:

  • Concerns about the too much screen time hasn’t been noticed by those who have visited classrooms.  Parents are encouraged to come in and visit at any time and see for themselves.  Computers are always present, but kids aren’t always on them.
  • “Additional” focus areas should not be considered additional (9% of grade).  FPCS has requested that Summit change the name of this second layer of  tougher focus areas
  • Focus areas are not the most important part of the work or grading (only 30% of the student grade – Projects are 70%!)
  • There is always homework.  Students can work on much of the focus area review work on their own time.  Assessments must be done under the supervision of a staff member.
  • Statements that teachers aren’t  providing direct instruction throughout each week is incorrect.  Different teachers do different amounts in different ways, but all are still teaching.
  • The belief that the California curriculum is the content in the platform (Actually, the teachers aligned the curriculum in each course to the Ohio Learning Standards prior to deployment and modify the material in the platform as needed.)
  • The traditional “A, B, C” grading isn’t being used (Actually, the letter grade performance can be reviewed in the progress area of the platform.)

Constructive critiques:

  • Effectiveness of implementation seems to vary between teachers and between grade levels
  • Some MS kids feel there isn’t enough Personalized Learning Time (PLT) during the week.  (Last year, there seemed to be more PLT and students could move from teacher to teacher as needed with PLT Fridays.)

Areas for (short-term) change:

  • Provide more instructional sessions for parents explaining the platform and how grading is determined.
  • Although focus areas can be done in any order and at any time, align the power focus areas and the additional focus areas vertically that have common content in the projects.  This will align the learning and application of the content (and may also reduce student anxiety and frustration.)
  • Have students keep notes during the completion of the assessments so  teachers can review the student’s thought processes and be better able to provide feedback.
  • Have the MS PLT structured more like the HS (so students can have more time with the content-area teacher in the areas they need most)  Consider returning to PLT day structure.
  • With the extended block schedule, be sure to include activities (and furniture) to break up the long block and provide for student need for movement.
  • Besides encouraging the additional focus areas, provide more challenge to students who are capable of moving faster and going deeper.  Include more higher-level projects, readings, content, etc.

Areas needing further investigation/research/discussion:

  • There is still confusion with both students and parents about summer extension: who is expected to attend, and how it works.

Positives:

  • The focus of these changes is on getting students to a higher-level understanding and application of their knowledge, not just memorizing facts and spitting them back out.
  • The mentoring time every day is good.
  • Operation Advantage (OA) does a nice job teaching students note-taking and other helpful learning skills.
  • An assessment center is being set up for students to take assessments after school.  The opportunities for students to also take assessments before school, during winter break and during spring break has been very helpful.

 

April 9, 2018, 5:30 p.m.

Those in attendance:

Parents and Students

Dan Munro

Kathrina Allen

Kristen Butterfield

Candace Ristago

Debbie Costanzo

Melissa & Dave Hille

Carol Akel

Justine Allen

Board

M. St. John

J. Dalton

Admin.

C. Vicha

M. Wightman

B. Wagner

Teachers

D. Latkovic

K. Conner

A. Slack

 

Listen to the Conversation

Concerns:

  • Mentoring is not happening regularly as originally stated (minimum of 10 minutes with their mentor each week) – students should have more mentoring.
  • Students feel there are no consequences being able to take assessments multiple times… students are encouraged to procrastinate using this system.
  • There are concerns that the amount of screen time may be too much.  How much time is actually spent by students staring at the screens?
  • Students can “pull the wool over [parents’] eyes” about how they are doing.

Misperceptions/misinformation:

  • Students who finish their focus areas prior to the end of the year are “done”.  (In most cases, they they still need to complete their projects. If those are done too, students can move ahead to the next course in the sequence.  Time is the variable – learning is the constant.)
  • Students often say they don’t have any homework.  (Truth is, students ALWAYS have homework!)

Constructive critiques:

  • Not all mentors “do” mentoring the same – some are better than others.
  • There were a lot of changes for 6th graders in the first year of implementation (last year). The system was implemented so quickly, it was a challenge for students and parents.
  • There is nothing “tangible” (physical papers) being brought home.
  • There needs to be more teacher to parent contact when students are not keeping up with their work.

Areas for (short-term) change:

  • Communicate the process of interventions required prior to taking assessments over.
  • Communicate more to parents about:
    • Where Summit came from and why it was implemented
    • Data showing current student performance and progress (MAP, etc.)
    • The research behind the changes in teaching, learning and assessment
    • The “soft skills” that are also being taught in the process
  • Have students begin note-taking skill development prior to 6th grade – Explain the gradual “weaning” off the use of notes for assessments better to students and parents.
  • Address the addictive nature of screen time with students and parents – Monitor the amount of time students are on the computer while learning.
  • Communicate the efforts the district is taking to protect student data and privacy.

Areas needing further investigation/research/discussion:

  • Discussions:  Continue conversations about intrinsic motivation, pride, locus of control, grit, determination, persistence, drive, self-respect (Concern about the disrespect toward those who achieve and the sub-culture of resistance to achievement… e.g., It’s not “cool” to like Summit or do well in school)
  • Research:  Is there a system that would analyze the amount of time a student is actually on the computer during the school day?

Positives:

  • Summit is working very well for some students (example of a parent’s high performing daughter was given).
  • The projects are “great”.
  • The 5th grade to 6th grade “high touch” transition process has been much better.
  • The efforts toward the whole person learning is “a good thing”.
  • The shift to “student-led learning” and student ownership for their learning has been a positive change (hard, but good).
  • This year’s implementation has been better than last year’s.  “Every year will get better.”
  • The culture of intrinsic motivation has improved dramatically.
  • Fairview should be proud of being on the forefront of this effort to change the focus on learning.
  • Melanie Wightman is very responsive – reach out to her.

 

April 11, 2o18

Those in attendance:

Parents and Students

Dan Lucas

Melissa Conrad

David Conrad

Nicole Gordon

Holly Link Perek

Ben Murray

Twyla Sales

Erica Kaufmann

David Tucker

 

Board

K. Dubay Gillis

M. St. John

Admin.

B. Wagner

M. Wightman

C. Vicha

Teachers

A. Bruening

G. Graves

L. Oxley

M. Cory

Listen to the Conversation

 

Concerns:

  • What is being said is occurring in the classrooms is not really happening.
  • Concern that going into the classroom, as District has encouraged parents and community members to do, will not show what is really happening in the classroom.  (Nothing but a “dog and pony show”)
  • Administrators are not holding teachers accountable to do what they are supposed to be doing.
  • The teachers aren’t grading the projects fast enough.
  • Teachers aren’t implementing Summit  (the academic changes) equally as well.  
  • There is a difference between advocating for students and enabling them.
  • Concern that there is too much screen time occurring at the school.
  • There is not enough interaction between teacher and students.
  • Are kids just “gaming” the system or really learning?
  • This is not preparing students for college.
  • There is an undercurrent (sub-culture) among students that discourages success and achievement.

 

Misperceptions/misinformation:

  • Teachers are forced to teach a specific way because they use the PLP.  (Actually, are able to teach the content in their own unique ways and are able to apply their individual skills, talents and abilities.)
  • The prior performance of the district was not as good as is remembered or as the state report card showed.  (There was limited curricular alignment, the state report card “bars” were set much lower than they are now, the tests are much different and difficult now…)
  • Focus areas are the most important part of classes using the platform.  (Actually, focus areas only account for 30% of a student’s grade. The projects account for 70% of the student’s grade.)
  • Kids do everything on the computer (Actually, teachers encourage the use of note-taking, books, writing and editing on paper, testing journals, etc.)
  • The curriculum in the platform is Summit (California) curriculum.  (Actually, the teachers fully edited the curriculum in the platform, removing things as needed, adding their best material, and assuring alignment to the Ohio Learning Standards.)
  • Students are routinely taking content area assessments multiple times (double-digit) and aren’t doing anything in between.  (At the end of the first semester, over 50% of assessments taken were passed on the first attempt. Also, students are expected to demonstrate additional effort (work with a teacher or partner, review another available resource, complete another activity, take more/refine current notes, etc.) before the assessment is made available for another attempt.)

 

Constructive critiques:

  • Students are failing if they are failing assessments.  They are being permitted to fail. They should not be permitted to take tests over and over.
  • Teachers are checking off student notes that are inaccurate.

 

Areas for (short-term) change:

  • Communicate more about grading (A, B, C, D, F distributions, how it’s determined, etc.)
  • Make the projects more engaging, more local – This is where the majority of the teaching and learning occurs.
  • Communicate the changes that are implemented more clearly.
  • Accentuate the importance of content application, skill development and soft skills.
  • Provide more information and explanation about the Cognitive Skills Rubric.
  • Communicate more about the TLC (Teaching and Learning Center), what happens in daily mentoring, the middle school Operation Advantage class, and daily teacher collaborative time
  • Review the data that shows how many times students are taking assessments for each unit of each course to identify students who are taking specific assessments multiple times.  (Note: teachers can see for each student exactly what assessments a student has taken, how much time he/she took to complete each oe, and how many attempts were previously made on a specific content assessment for all content areas.)

 

Areas needing further investigation/research/discussion:

  • Provide more information to parents about the research foundation behind Summit and the implementation strategies being used by the Fairview Park City Schools.
  • Additional discussion:  When is failing ok and when is it NOT ok?

 

Positives:

  • This program would work if everyone did it like Mr. Garcia (“He doesn’t let students take assessments 17 times.”)
  • The platform is “beautifully laid out”
  • Being project-based is “so wonderful” (and it’s really difficult)
  • The focus on executive functioning (goal setting, note taking, growth mindset, organizational skills, self-advocating, grit, etc.) is good.
  • The use of “controlled failure” is good, but must be implemented well to work.
  • The level of teacher collaboration is higher now than ever before.
  • Using the platform makes the curriculum, teacher grading/feedback, student effort and student work completely transparent.  (Never has been before.)
  • Students are “proud” of their accomplishments.
  • The culture of 6-12 is changing to truly value hard work, learning and achievement

 

April 18, 2018

Board

J. Shucofsky

J. Dalton

Admin

B. Wagner

R. Mohr

M. Wightman

Teachers

Carli Vandrak

Kristen Conner

Lori Oxley

Parents and Students

Carrie DeSarle

Marty Joyce

Claudia Howett

Christy George

Peggy Greenwell

Tiffany Holliday

Lani Ginley

Jared Wesley

Dylan Wesley

Ben Kolocin

Melissa Maienknecht

Csilla Nemeth

Listen to the Conversation:

Those in attendance:

Parents and Students Board Admin. Teachers

Christy George

Board

J. Shucofsky

J. Dalton

Admin

B. Wagner

M. Wightman

R. Mohr

Teachers

Kristen Conner

Carli Vandrak

Lori Oxley

Parents and Students

Claudia Howett

Peggy Greenwell

Marty Joyce

Carrie DeSarle

Tiffany Holliday

Lani Ginley

Jared Wesley

Dylan Wesley

Ben Kolocin

Melissa Maienknecht

Csilla Nemeth

 

Concerns:

  • Letting students take assessments over and over is not preparing students for real life.
  • The problem isn’t the platform, it’s that the teachers aren’t implementing the changes equally the same or equally as well.
  • The kids are feeling like they aren’t retaining anything.
  • “Kids are coming home complaining they are bored and are staring at the computers all day.”
  • Students can turn in assignments late and still get full credit.
  • “School is no longer fun for students.”
  • “Every kid should be on the same page at the same time.”
  • The shift to the 6th grade and keeping up with the blue line are both stressful for kids.
  • Kids should not be required to do any school work after school or on weekends.
  • Some students are not confident that they will be ready for the ACT or college.

Misperceptions/misinformation:

  • Statements that students are staring at the screen all day, “like online school.”  (The teachers encouraged parents to come into their classrooms to prove that is not the case.)
  • The program doesn’t really allow students to work at their own pace, as was originally stated.  (Students can’t always work ahead on the projects.)

Constructive critiques:

  • Students want more individual guidance from teachers.
  • Teachers are implementing Summit Learning inconsistently  (“There should be a set standard”)
  • Students should receive failing grades instead of being able to retake content assessments.
  • Mentors who are not the content teachers are not as helpful for the students.

Areas for (short-term) change:

  • Teachers should reach out to parents sooner when a student begins to struggle.
  • Provide more communication about the research behind the changes being implemented.
  • Be more consistent in the delivery and teaching 6-10  (Implement the current norms more consistently.)
  • Continue and expand the level of training for the teachers
  • If a student does well on the diagnostic assessment (pre-test), allow him/her to take the content assessment (post-test) without first providing study notes.
  • Have teachers create study guides for all topics to better align the information to be learned with what is tested.
  • Continue to provide parent information sessions and support.
  • Continue providing multiple ways to assess whether a student has learned the material.
  • Include a one week gap between projects.
  • Implement some minor consequences for procrastination on projects (not for students who need more time), but not so dramatic that it cripples a student’s ability to continue and eventually succeed.

Areas needing further investigation/research/discussion:

Positives:

  • Fairview has some great teachers.
  • The data is showing progress.
  • It’s good that students aren’t being permitted to fall behind and quit (holding their feet to the fire with before and after school tutoring, winter/spring break tutoring, summer extension.)
  • The focus on cognitive skills is good.

 

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  • @fhsprincipal

    RT @fhsprincipal: Saw this posted around the building today. SO COOL to see new after school clubs forming from interests shared during Thu…

  • Our food services department is proud to partner with local farmers to provide fresh vegetables and fruits for our… https://t.co/lPJR16Vy2R